The New Design-y Wornettes

Jackie, Hannah, and Maegan Wornettes share their love of Clueless, Spice Girls, and the '60s

What do Jackie, Hannah, and Maegan all have in common? They all hate Comic Sans, they know what kerning is, and they all like to save widows and orphans in their spare time. Oh, and they are the newest additions to WORN’s graphic design team!

Hi, I’m Jackie
A Vancouverite, I was raised on the Beatles and dreamt of becoming a Spice Girl—platform shoes, flare pants, and choker necklaces were all staples of my wardrobe. From a young age, I wore my style on my sleeve, and my love for fashion has not faltered, but I certainly like to think my taste has matured. Now my days are filled with Kendrick Lamar, episodes of Parks and Rec and daydreams of the future Alexander Wang bag I will someday own.

… and I’m Hannah
My appreciation for clothing goes back to the playground, where I insisted on wearing puffy party dresses as a toddler. I’d say my style is eclectic, with bits of inspiration from everywhere, though I do have an affinity for the late ’60s. I love designs that are clean and fresh, with a touch of femininity and quirkiness. When I’m not doing design work I like to be out and about—exploring Toronto’s quaint cafes and shops—and make Brooch Boyfriends. I look forward to joining the WORN community of lovely, creative, and stylish people.

… don’t forget Maegan!
My first foray into fashion was watching Clueless when I was six. I shared WORN’s love of Cher Horowitz and I begged my mom to buy me plaid backpacks. I also love Michelle Williams movies, analogue photography, and John Green novels. I like ideas, especially in relation to fashion and culture. I’m excited to be a part of WORN because it approaches fashion and style in an intelligent and creative way—something I’ve been looking for in a magazine for a long time.


Current inspirations

Jackie:
Designspiration
My main source of inspiration, this dream of a website is filled with page after page of beautiful design and enthralling typography.

The Man Repeller
The Man Repeller mixes patterns like it’s her job and has a knack for satirical writing; she’s my current go-to for fashion and wit.

RoAndCo
RoAndCo is a Big Apple design studio that specializes in fashion branding. With resonant ideas and designs, their work inspires me on a daily basis.

Hannah:
Tiger in a Jar
The site explores themes of home and kinfolk, along with nature and locality. The haunting pastoral photography and short films are frequent muses.

Frankie
A publication that focuses on affordable fashion and arts & crafts; this isn’t really a current inspiration, but rather a constant fixation.

Toronto street fashion
It’s wonderful to see our city’s celebration of personal style.

Maegan:
Misprinted Type
The portfolio of artist/illustrator Eduardo Recife has been my foremost artistic inspiration since I first discovered Photoshop as a teenager. To this day, his mixture of collage elements and deconstructed, hand-drawn type is everything I want my work to be and more.

Girls
My love for Girls borders on obsessive. Lena Dunham is a genius; she’s somehow written a play-by-play of different moments throughout my life, except her version is hilarious.

Rodarte
Rodarte is my favourite fashion house because the pieces are not only mesmerizingly beautiful, but they are always rooted in an interesting and intelligent idea. Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the great minds behind Rodarte, design beautiful, intricate masterpieces that function as clothing as well as art. Also, they’re friends with Tavi: always a plus.

photography // Laura Tuttle

Bundle Up with Love

The first chill of winter wind cutting through my layers always takes me back to my childhood, when the bitter cold always evoked the same feeling of dread in my bones: the horror of the winter parka. I vividly remember trying to sneak out the back door into the rolling hills of the first snow; tiptoeing across the icy tile floor to slowly open the squeaky door, I almost expected my mother’s slightly annoyed voice to stop me in my tracks with, “Wait, wait, you forgot your winter coat!”

I can still feel the overwhelming entrapment puffy garments meant for me. Stuffed into those marshmallow-like neon jackets, I was sweaty and annoyed, completely paralyzed from moving my arms in any practical manner and certainly unable to maneuver through the snow at a reasonable speed.

Apparently my mom enjoyed this feeling. Every year she pulled out her very own puffer, an item we coined her “sleeping bag coat,” turning her into a small human taco in a black insulated tortilla.

I freed myself from the chains of the puffy winter coat as soon as I was old enough to reasonably make wardrobe decisions for myself. I use the term “reasonably” quite loosely. For years I waded through the North Vancouver snow in next to nothing, always near hypothermia but never quite humble enough to admit it, especially to my triple-layered-taco mom. By the time I realized I was sick of feeling hypothermic every winter, I was already off to university in Toronto, a land that all Vancouverites warned me was, “so cold you couldn’t even go outside in the winter.” My very stylish father was alarmed by this news, and in order to ensure my survival in the desolate artic tundra of Canada’s East, he vowed to buy me an impenetrable parka.

True to his word, on the first day we landed in Toronto, we went shopping to find the ideal warm winter wrapping; I ended up with a fantastic navy blue twill parka lined with light blue silk and layered with pockets of down insulating the inside, complete with an Eskimo-style fur hood and big shiny silver buttons.

Although my mother was a little disappointed I turned down the black shiny puffer-coat options she had presented, when she felt the weight of my new parka she was satisfied; I would be warm.

Over the years, having suffered through winters full of nagging and many claustrophobic moments of being buried under too many layers, I’ve come to realize my mom was just trying to teach me the most important survival skill in a Canadian winter: staying warm, inside and out. In retrospect, the donning of the winter coat was always linked with hugs and kisses, warm shortbread cookies, and homemade apple cider — all my mother’s ways of keeping her family as warm as possible. Now in my twenties, I am always eager to layer up each winter with my parka, sweet treats, and lots of love — proof that mothers always know best. My mother, to this day, still wears her sleeping bag coat, proudly donning it every holiday season.

Alyssa Garrison
Photography by Erika Neilly

Crushing on Lydia Okello

Lydia Okello’s wardrobe is like a box of chocolates – you never know what you’re going to get. Her ability to perfectly mis-match colours and garments never ceases to amaze me. The 21-year-old fashion merchandising student’s blog, Style Is Style, is a mix of personal style shots with inspirational editorial shoots. She’s quite sweet herself.

What was your first favourite outfit as a kid?
My mom sewed a lot of my clothing as a kid, and I remember having a large floral print dress with matching hair piece (either a scrunchy or hat) that I couldn’t wait to wear on Sundays to church when I was four. I think I loved it so much because a) it was matching and b) it was very, very girly. I think all of the pieces have been donated by now, so somewhere there is a kid wearing a 90′s dress that used to be mine!

Do you have similar taste in clothing now?
I actually find my self reverting back to my early childhood wardrobe. I had many dresses, and lots of girly, frilly things. Nowadays I look for the same elements in pieces for my wardrobe. You will very seldom see me in pants, I am hopelessly devoted to being pantless for eternity.

Tell us a story about the garment or accessory you love most.
One of my very favourite pieces (and it’s very hard to choose) is a floral print, scalloped neckline 80′s dress that I thrifted back in Grade 10. At the time, I was just beginning to sort of develop my style, and I was always on the lookout for 50′s inspired pieces at the local thrift store. I found this dress and I nearly had a heart attack! The print, the shape, the fact that it had a tulle underskirt… It seemed like a dream dress come true! I think at the time it didn’t actually completely fit properly, but I bought it anyway. I had debated converting it into a strapless dress, but luckily I was too lazy to actually do it. The scalloped details are actually my favorite part of the dress now! One of the reasons I love this particular dress so much is that I always feel good in it. When I went on a whirlwind trip to New York Fashion Week in the spring of 2010, I wore it, so now it also has really amazing memories attached to it too. It’s my “happy” dress!
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