No Wornettes Were Harmed in the Making of this Blind Date

Anna and Eliza Wornette are locked in the office, asked to talk shoes, love it, and then go for drinks happily after

Anna and Eliza talk shoes

The lives of certain Wornettes intersect more than others. Editorial Wornettes gather around the table with other editorial Wornettes. Likewise for the stylists. This is just the nature of the magazine beast. But sometimes, serendipitously (read: when we ask them to), two Wornettes, who have not been able to get in as much quality time, sit down in the office for a good solid chat. And this time, the chat was about SHOES.

Anna: I’ve got big feet. They’re like, size 11/12 women’s and I wear a lot of like really simple flats ’cause I’m also six feet tall. I have this one pair of brown boots with a bit of a heel and they lace up. I got them at a vintage sale. They fit and I never find shoes that fit, especially not vintage. I think they’re originally from Aldo or someplace really boring but they’re the only heels I’m actually comfortable in.

Eliza: I don’t wear any heels either.

A: ‘Cause you’re also tall!

E: I’m pretty tall and when I wear high heels, I’m kind of towering over everyone. I don’t know. I like seeing other peoples’ faces.

A: I was in high school when Facebook became a thing, and everyone had joined Facebook groups. I was part of one called “Cute Girls with Big Feet” about where to find shoes for tall people. Then I got a friend request from a guy I didn’t know and he messaged me, “Do you have big feet? Do you have old shoes you can give me?” So I blocked him and every few months, I would get a friend request from Steven Smallfoot or Mr. Bigfoot Lover and I would just block him right away. He’d send me surveys like, “Eye color? Shoe size? Do you ever sweat in your shoes? What do your shoes smell like?” and they’d be like really sexual. So, I had to leave the group.

E: …Wow. [laughs]

A: I walk a lot and I don’t wear socks and my shoes do smell bad, so I probably could pay my rent by selling him my old shoes but I have not done that. True story. [laughs] Okay, what are the weirdest shoes that you own?

E: Actually I’m not sure I own any particularly weird shoes. My sibling actually got a really cool pair of shoes from Chinatown and they were Kool Aid shoes; they were completely orange.

A: Like dyed with Kool Aid, or?

E: They were orange shoes and then they had the Kool Aid mascot on them. Those shoes are awesome but I don’t really have any really statement-y shoes. I’ve always wanted these rain boots that I used to have when I was a kid. They had little frog eyes on the front.

A: Were they green?

E: Yes, they were green. But they definitely don’t make them in my size anymore.

A: I used to actually work at a shoe store as a quote-unquote sales associate which meant that like I had to find sizes for people. All the shoes were on the floor too, so I’d point and be like “Oh, there’s your size” and that was literally my job. People would ask me fashion questions, but we sold like the simplest generic shoes so I’d have to say “Sure, yeah, those like, black loafers are in for fall. You should get them. Or perhaps try brown. ” Like black and brown were the only colours.

E: My mom’s actually a really big shoe collector. Her eyes just light up around them. I guess that’s why I’m not as much into shoes, because I spent so much time in shoe stores when I was a kid. Hats were like my main priority because I’m tall; I feel like my shoes are so far away. I mean, your feet are at the bottom of your body.

A: But it’s something you notice because shoes change the way you walk and stand and hold yourself more than really any other clothes, unless you’re wearing a corset or something.

E: Do you have a dream pair of shoes that you’ve kind of always been looking for but never found?

A: When I pay attention to runway shows, I don’t look at shoes as much but there was this Balenciaga shoe in, I want to say it was 2009, and the heels were like rock mineral experiments. Something you would look at in a high school geology. Is geology even a thing you do in high school?

E: I’ve always liked this shoe designed by Jeremy Scott. Just these sneakers that are fuzzy and had a teddy bear attached to them.

A: That’s such a you thing to like.

E: I’ve been obsessing over them. I think that kind of shoe is like, really a statement shoe.

A: It’s kind of like a grownup version of those rain boots.

E: Yes. [laughs]

A: I’m into sneakers lately. I’m like, “I’m laid back. I’m cool. I wear sneakers with my dress.”

E: When I was a teenager, I really liked Lily Allen. She always wore those prom dresses with the sneakers and big hoops. I had never thought of someone dressing up like that and wearing such casual shoes. There’s this movie I saw, Party Girl.

A: With Parker Posey?

E: She’s the most memorable character from movies or TV shows with her shoes. She was wearing these platform sneakers. They were white.

A: Platforms. Oh god!

E: I really love them, though.

A: All I can think of is the Spice Girls and the Union Jack shoes.

E: When I was 16, I went to New York with my mom and we were looking through all the stores on Bleecker Street. There’s one store I really liked so we were spending a bit more time there. It was pretty empty and there was a photographer in the store. And then the photographer started talking to us and said that they were doing an article about round-toed heels, which were in style at the time, and that they needed someone to wear them for the photoshoot.

A: That’s such a “small town girl goes to the big city and becomes a model” thing [laughs].

E: It was in the New York Times. My dad sent it to all the relatives.

A: So you’ve been in The Times!

E: I don’t even know if I actually read the article! [laughs] I was just like, “Cool!”

A: Did you end up getting the shoes?

E: No. I felt like I should get the shoes, it was a pretty nice store, but I would always rather buy a hat.

illustration // Averill Smith

Processing Perfection

Something to do over the holidays: The Bata Shoe Museum chronicles Roger Vivier's creative process

While we have expressed our love for the beautifully designed shoes of Roger Vivier in our shoe issue, there’s a stark difference between seeing something on the page and seeing something in real life. Toronto’s Bata Shoe Museum’s current exhibit Process to Perfection features some of Vivier’s most stunning works. Not only is it a good complement to our article (hint hint), it also acts as an informative look into the life and working process of the renowned shoe designer.

The artifacts in this exhibit come from the Bata Shoe Museum’s holdings, as well as the Roger Vivier Brand, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Deutsches Ledermuseum in Germany, with each institution helping to document the history of Vivier’s rise to mastery of his craft. While the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Roger Vivier Brand may provide elegant examples of Vivier’s distinct aesthetic such as the Pilgrim buckle and the perfection of the stiletto heel, pieces of the process of “becoming” Vivier can be found elsewhere. For example, many sketches, as well as “pullover” prototypes from the archives at the Bata Shoe Museum are included in the display, alongside some of Vivier’s earliest prototypes created while working at a German leather company during the ’30s. These pieces were only recently discovered as a part of Vivier’s material legacy, given the fact they were created prior to his fame as a designer.

Vivier’s work has become so ubiquitous in ’50s cinema that to see his work broken down to its elements is a reminder of all the work that exists behind some of the most iconic shoes.

further information // Roger Vivier film and lecture series, on through April 2013
further reading // Rea McNamara on Vivier in issue 8′s “Belle Pied”
illustration // Solange Yepez

Remember When It Used To Be Warm?

Worn to WORN: Jenna Wornette dressed somewhere between "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" and "Bewitched"

What inspired this outfit?
I was going for loungy, light and dream-like. It was really hot out that day, so I wanted to be comfortable, but still fashionable and a little eccentric. Most of my clothes are second hand – looking like they were made somewhere between the ’60s, and the ’80s. I like the colours, prints and the attitudes associated with those times.

Tell me about one of the items you are wearing.
My dress is from the Salvation Army across the street from the old WORN office. It was under $10, which automatically makes it a great item. I love the quilted panel and the slight point in the seams of the chest – darted busts intrigue me. The colours are amazing and the print is genius – it’s the wings of butterflies.

What is the best book to read in this outfit?
The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe. This is a dress to take drugs in, if I’ve ever seen one.

What style icon would wear this outfit?
Endora, Samantha’s mother on Bewitched. It has the retro housedress vibe to it, and my recently dyed black hair has a witchy feel to it.

outfit credits // Dress, earrings and bracelet are thrifted from the Salvation Army, shoes by Betsy Johnson.

photography // Hailey Siracky