Rebecca S. Wornette

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I grew up on Pop Rocks candy, Spice Girls, Kubrick films, and T-Rex albums. Growing up in a small town just north of Toronto meant ample fresh air, accompanied by knitted hats and scarves from my mother, wearing my father’s gigantic Wellington boots outside, and spending more time in a bathing suit than out of one in August. I always loved fashion, but for practicality sake, I wore mostly jeans. I would sketch designs in purple notebooks of long dresses worn with chunky heels and matching handbags on the school bus. As a teen, I would watch hours of Fashion Television, eagerly anticipate my new issues of Elle magazine, and roll my eyes every time my mother said she just didn’t “get” Alexander McQueen.

When I moved to Toronto in 2010 to study journalism, I was able to explore fashion in whole new way. Shopping no longer consisted of the get-in-and-get-out missions it did back home, and jeans weren’t always the best option. Down here I could scour the racks, discover hole-in-the-wall stores and mull things over before purchasing. Now I am 22, and complete with polka-dot pants and a cheetah-print dress. So begins my next chapter in fashion exploration. I’m delighted that WORN is a part of it.

Man Repeller
This was the very first “I will love you ’til the end of time” fashion blog I followed. As a fashion junky, Leandra Medine puts her sarcastic and hilarious spin on the clothes women love to wear which some men would probably hate. My favourite segments are those titled “Lessons in Layers” that start with somewhat simple and flattering outfits, gradually doused in fur vests, baggy sweaters and heaps of bracelets and accessories. The message: Wear what you want. Fashion should be fun, and not so serious.

Malcolm Gladwell’s “True Colours”
In this 1999 New Yorker piece, Gladwell talks about the somewhat trivial, but still important, role hair dye played during the feminist movement in the latter half of the 20th century. Taken from his book, What the Dog Saw, “True Colours” reveals the moments behind the iconic L’Oreal and Clairol slogans we know all too well.

Thisisnotporn.net
Honestly, it’s not porn…well, maybe. This Is Not Porn is a compilation of rare star and celebrity photographs taken mostly in black and white. In this jumble of candid and staged shots there are smiles, silly faces, and really super clothes.

Commercial Pattern Archive
I learned to sew somewhere around age 10 and loved going to Fabricland with my mom and flipping through the giant stacks of Simplicity and Vogue patterns. The University of Rhode Island has put together an archive—you can’t access the whole thing unless you’re a member, but I love to scroll through the old pattern covers every now and again and see the different styles from decades gone by.

Not exactly Kurt Vonnegut’s 1997 MIT Address
As a 20-something trying to make it in this glorious world, I like to keep the words from this speech plastered to the walls of my brain. But as a journalist, I love to keep this piece close simply because it keeps me questioning everything. Although attributed to Kurt Vonnegut Jr., he never actually gave this speech. Vonnegut didn’t even write it, yet it made its way around the internet as another snippet of wisdom from the brilliant writer. If you’re blogging, writing papers or articles, or just spewing facts like Siri, know your sources, source your content, and most importantly, don’t forget the sunscreen.

photography // Laura Tuttle