Fashion Pop Show

We’re delighted to announce that Isabelle Campeau is the winner of this year’s Fashion POP! Look for her Invisible Cities-inspired creations in a four-page photo spread in Issue 14 of WORN.

Fashion POP was held in the basement of St. Édouard church last week, as part of the POP Montréal music festival’s 10th anniversary opening party. The festival has provided a forum to showcase young up-and-coming designers since 2007.

As always, Fashion POP was way more fun and relaxed than your typical fashion event, with not a wine glass in sight and beer served in plastic cups. DJ Cadence Weapon provided the soundtrack as six emerging designers presented mini-collections that showcased everything from a giant pink umbrella to a hood that doubled as a face mask, metallic gold pants, and intricate knits.

Campeau closed the show with light flowing dresses paired with structured jackets that could easily have gone straight from the runway to the Montreal streets. She was crowned winner by a panel of industry judges that included WORN’s Montreal editor, Emily Raine, and last year’s winner, Natasha Thomas. In addition to her WORN feature, Campeau was awarded $1,000 and a $500 Le Château gift certificate.



photography courtesy of Pop Montreal, LP Maurice

POP Goes the Puces: Part One

Sick and tired of the homogenous slew of reality competitions — excluding Project Runway — flying through your television’s airwaves? We sure are. Take a few minutes out of daydreaming about Tim Gunn as your own fairy godfather, and check out the contestants for this year’s FASHION POP event in Montreal. We’ve interviewed each designer, and will be featuring the winner in an upcoming issue, and if that isn’t enough POP for you, check out our features on previous winners Angie Johnson (issue 10) and By Thomas (issue 12).

REMY & MERCY by KAREN VAQUILAR

Where are you from? Where do you call home now?
I am originally from Edmonton, Alberta, but Montreal has been my home for the past two years.

What is the theme of your collection?
Carpenter / Military.

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
They change all the time. It’s fun to colour outside of the lines.

What was the first garment you ever made?
A pair of boxers I made in Grade 7 home-ec class.

If you could design the wardrobe for any fictional character, who would it be?

Spock.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
Having only two hands.

Do you wear your own designs?
Absolutely.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?
The city is really youthful and playful — people feel free to do their own thing whether it’s trendy or not. Anything goes.

GENEVIEVE SAVARD

Where are you from? Where do you call home now?
I’m from Edmonton and have been living in Montreal for a year and a half.

What is the theme of your collection?
Magic.

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
I usually change designs while draping or drafting. I might come up with a better idea, or something doesn’t work one way so I try another way. I enjoy this process as much as the drawing and dreaming.

What was the first garment you ever made?
I can’t really remember what the first garment I made was, but in my high school fashion class we had to make our own prom dress. I skipped prom and got drunk with my best friend. The prom dress was never worn.

If you could design the wardrobe for any fictional character, who would it be?
Sookie Stackhouse. I’d make her many vampy sun-dresses in blood-dyed silk.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
Deadlines. And working so much that you make yourself sick.

Do you wear your own designs?
I wear most of them quite a lot, but try not to think about myself so much when designing because it messes me up.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?

Montreal style? I don’t know, I don’t get out much. But I do think Canada could stand to be a little more brave, fashion-wise.

MAUDE NIBELUNGEN

Where are you from? Where do you call home now?
I’m from deep in the country. Home is really where I feel good. It changes a lot over time.

What is the theme of your collection?
Lost souls of Atlantis…

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
I don’t like to restrain myself much with a sketch, or planning too much. I usually have a picture or an idea in my head, and I’ll just start knitting, writing the pattern as I am executing it. It feels more natural to me that way. By just following what seems like the evolution of the piece, they almost become living creatures for me.

What was the first garment you ever made?
I made a lot of little things for my dolls and such since the age of 5. But the one I really reckon as the first was a beanie I made when I was 13. I took hundreds of little strings of yarn from a yarn ordering book and attached them all together to knit them.

If you could design the wardrobe for any fictional character, who would it be?
Probably a manga character.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
Balance. I think it’s important that the collection feels wholesome — a bit of everything, in different ways — but still having all those elements matching together somehow.

Do you wear your own designs?
I used to. Back then I was only making pieces for myself. But as I have to design and produce more and more, I tend to prefer encouraging other designers by wearing their designs.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?
I don’t think there is a “set” look for Montreal fashion, and there’s a lot of diversity from one designer to another. We pick here and there, mix it all up, and make something else out of it — a bit European, a bit American, and end up with a totally different look.

interviews by Casie Brown
photography by Lindsey Fast

POP Goes the Puces: Part Two

Ready to get your Simon Cowell on? (Just kidding, be nice!) Here are the final three contestants for Montreal’s FASHION POP. We hate to sound like your nagging mother, but remember to join the Puces Pop Fair group on Facebook, for a chance to win a subscription to WORN, and visit their event page for more information.


EVITA by MARIE-EVE DION

How long have you been designing under this name?
It’s quite new actually. I’ve just graduated from Ecole Supérieure de Mode Montréal in fashion design and I had decided to put this project (having my own company) on hold. But since I have been approached by FASHION POP, I thought it was a good timing to start it.

Where are you from? Where do you call home now?

I’m from Orford\Magog, but actually call Montreal home, after arriving five years ago.

What is the theme of your collection?
L’aube me jette. It is quite abstract and poetic at the same time, representing all the softness and weirdness one can find in my collection. I took my inspiration from automatic writing and played with letters as my canvas. So all my clothes are made from letters and are telling their own story.

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
In this particular case, I didn’t have any sketches, because what really started my creation process was my experimentation with shapes and fabrics. Not knowing what the result would be was, in fact, essential to my process.

What was the first garment you ever made?
My mother taught me how to sew, and I chose to make a ’60s inspired red dress.

If you could design the wardrobe for any fictional character, who would it be?
Let’s admit it: I don’t like princesses, but I would like to dress the one from the Last Unicorn movie. I really enjoy the aesthetic of that movie.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
Considering it done. I always find something that needs to be fixed.

Do you wear your own designs?
Yes. I always try to incorporate a piece of my own designs in my daily wear. Not so easy considering I do not have a lot of free time to make new garments for myself.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?
The thing is that there is a lot of talent in Montreal but we sometimes struggle to showcase it, partly because of our lack of money, but also of a lack of visibility. Our market is quite insular. But I do feel like it is about to change. Young designers are really trying to showcase new ideas and create new kinds of events.


JONATHAN SCHMIDT

What is the theme of your collection?
Generally, subjectivity and beauty. Particularly, the role of the designer’s ideology and bias in defining beauty through the medium of clothing.

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
Sketching plays a huge role in my design process. I won’t start creating a new garment until I am totally satisfied with all the details of the design. I put absolute trust in my original concept, so (for better or worse) compromising the original design is something I have a lot of trouble doing. As such, everything I make resembles the original design very closely.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
Designing is the easy part, it’s everything after that’s hard. I’m uncertain what I will feel once this collection is out but I know that it’s just the beginning of a new phase of bringing product to market and trying to establish a business.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?
I really can’t tell. It seems like the internet’s strongest cultural influence has been facilitating conformity. In every metropolitan centre I’ve been in, young, urban people do everything the same.


ISABELLE CAMPEAU

What is the theme of your collection?
It is inspired by Italo Calvino’s novel from 1972 titled Invisible City. I see it as a sensible homage to visible and invisible layers that constitute the city. I wanted to do the same in my collection, but on an individual scale.

Do you find that your designs evolve or change much from the initial sketch to end product?
I always start with making small models and constructions. I don’t sketch a lot. Then, it changes until the end. It’s always in process.

What was the first garment you ever made?
I was always doing alterations on every single garment I had, I can’t remember the first one.

What is the most difficult part of designing a collection?
It’s impossible to stay objective. However, you have a lot of decisions to make and you have to know where to stop.

Do you wear your own designs?
Yes.

What makes Montreal style and fashion different from other Canadian cities or American fashion?
There is a great lifestyle in Montreal, a kind of cosiness that is somehow reflected in the way people dress.

interviews by Casie Brown
photography by Lindsey Fast

Puces Pop is Back (and They Want You)!


If you live in Montreal and are a fan of independent music, fashion, and art, you are probably somewhat aware of Puces Pop, the five day cultural festival that celebrates the city’s coolest.

Now in their 10th year, Puces Pop is currently seeking vendors for their craft sale, taking on September 24th and 25th. This carefully curated event will showcase the best of independent designer, artists, and crafters — and you know you want in on this. Applications are due on August 8th.

Visit the application page for more information.

Photo by Inma Salcedo