Think Pink!

Alyssa Wornette shares her favorite set of ultra-girly internet snippets

Lately I’ve been floating around on fluffy pink cotton candy clouds, sipping pink tea in a lavender bath and sporting pink mittens with my new knitted cat ear hat. It seems everywhere I look, I am left helplessly fawning over whatever cutesy, fluffy, object-with-a-face meets my eye. This existence trapped within rose-tinted glasses has of course bled into my cyber activity, and inadvertently, into my link roundup:

Kittens, Unicorns, and Puppies, Oh My!
Cats riding rainbow unicorns on a pink heart background ON A SCARF? Yeah, do I need to say more to communicate the brilliance of Silken Favours? If you need to hear more to be fully converted, read this great interview with the creator, Vicki Murdoch, and learn why she thinks everyone should own a scarf.

Bubble Pop
I love K-pop. I am NOT ashamed to throw this love in others’ faces, switching the playlists at parties to my friends’ shock and dismay. Too bad. Just look at their sets, their dance moves, and most importantly THEIR STYLE! From the adorable flower crowns and cat tails of AKB48, to the yellow braids and tiger-print pants of G Dragon, this piece by John Seabrook captures a great tasting of K-pop style and sound.

“I’m the Mary!”
Growing up, Romy and Michele held the keys to my heart. Aside from their hilarious date ditching tactics (“Will you please excuse me, I cut my foot before and my shoe is filling up with blood”), they had the most fearless fashion sense and lived on a candy-filled diet. I got a 15 out of 16 on this quiz, and I’m celebrating with candy corns.

Cattoed, if only for one day
Ever thought you loved cats so much that you wanted to cover your body in them? Well, thanks to illustrator Harriet Gray, you can! These temporary tattoos are so adorable they are almost fluffy on your skin, and bonus: once your cat craze is over (if it ever is) they’ll wash right off!

Call on Me
I recently visited Pacific Mall for the first time. I walked in with a basic iPhone in an Etsy-ordered case. I walked out with a pink iPhone, complete with 3 different new cases and several accessories, like a popsicle plug for the headphone jack. I never realized phones could change with your outfits, but NEWS FLASH, it’s totally possible! The Cute iPhone Cases Tumblr validates this new obsession.

My Teenage Dream
No roundup of mine would be complete without a Katy Perry reference. We can all haggle over Katy’s upbringing, her choice of lyrics, and her politics, but when it comes down to her style and HAIRSTYLES, no one can really debate her genius. Case and point, this Glamour UK photo collection of KP’s 58 best hair days.

Book Review – 60′s Fashion: Vintage Fashion and Beauty Ads

This nearly pocket-sized mini-book doesn’t hold the appeal of extensive text or impressive knowledge to share, but it sure offers up some amazing photographs and quirky advertising that’s almost guaranteed to bring a smile to your face.

A member of the Taschen Icon series, the hot pink paperback is miniature version of the much pricier coffee-table edition. Not much writing sits between the front and back cover, only a short prologue by Laura Schooling of Style.com that outlines the era and delves into a short description of what it was like to live during the 60′s, handily including translations in English, German and French.


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Shock of Pink: How a Colour Shaped Schiaparelli’s Vision

photos from Victoria and Albert Museum

Colours fascinated Elsa Schiaparelli. Her autobiography, Shocking Life, is paved by her colour discoveries, from the blue and red uniforms she designed during the First World War to the oranges and turquoises of Kremlin treasures.

In the first third of her book, however, the colour pink only comes up only to describe her new-born daughter, Gogo. Schiaparelli’s early career was, much like her contemporary Coco Chanel’s, defined by black and white. The first garment she created, in 1927, was a jumper with “a white bow against a white background.” Her first evening dress was, again, monochromatic.

The shocking-pink came thanks to Schiaparelli’s first foray into fragrances. In 1937, while struggling to name her upcoming perfume, she remembered a pink Tête de Bélier Cartier diamond owned by her friend, client and Paris editor for Harper’s Bazaar, Daisy Fellowes. In her autobiography, Schiap (as she nicknamed herself) describes the jewel colour as “bright, impossible, impudent, becoming, life-giving, like all the light and the birds and the fish in the world but together, a color of China and Peru but not of the West – a shocking colour, pure and undiluted.” She asked Surrealist designer Leonor Fini to create a perfume bottle imitating Mae West curves in that very shade. The perfume was named “Shocking”.
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