Win a Spread in WORN Fashion Journal

Fashion POP seeks entrants for their annual fashion design contest

Attention emerging designers! Fashion POP is once again searching for up-and-coming Montreal talent to participate in their seventh annual competition on Wednesday, September 25 at The Rialto Theatre in Montreal. Each designer will present a 6-look collection to a panel of industry judges for the chance to win a $1000 cash prize courtesy of Le Chateau, a spread in WORN Fashion Journal, and a pop-up showcase at Espace POP. Previous winners include Dane Richards, Norwegian Wood, and Isabelle Campeau.

For more information about how to submit your work, visit the website. The deadline for submissions is August 23.

The New Design-y Wornettes

Jackie, Hannah, and Maegan Wornettes share their love of Clueless, Spice Girls, and the '60s

What do Jackie, Hannah, and Maegan all have in common? They all hate Comic Sans, they know what kerning is, and they all like to save widows and orphans in their spare time. Oh, and they are the newest additions to WORN’s graphic design team!

Hi, I’m Jackie
A Vancouverite, I was raised on the Beatles and dreamt of becoming a Spice Girl—platform shoes, flare pants, and choker necklaces were all staples of my wardrobe. From a young age, I wore my style on my sleeve, and my love for fashion has not faltered, but I certainly like to think my taste has matured. Now my days are filled with Kendrick Lamar, episodes of Parks and Rec and daydreams of the future Alexander Wang bag I will someday own.

… and I’m Hannah
My appreciation for clothing goes back to the playground, where I insisted on wearing puffy party dresses as a toddler. I’d say my style is eclectic, with bits of inspiration from everywhere, though I do have an affinity for the late ’60s. I love designs that are clean and fresh, with a touch of femininity and quirkiness. When I’m not doing design work I like to be out and about—exploring Toronto’s quaint cafes and shops—and make Brooch Boyfriends. I look forward to joining the WORN community of lovely, creative, and stylish people.

… don’t forget Maegan!
My first foray into fashion was watching Clueless when I was six. I shared WORN’s love of Cher Horowitz and I begged my mom to buy me plaid backpacks. I also love Michelle Williams movies, analogue photography, and John Green novels. I like ideas, especially in relation to fashion and culture. I’m excited to be a part of WORN because it approaches fashion and style in an intelligent and creative way—something I’ve been looking for in a magazine for a long time.


Current inspirations

Jackie:
Designspiration
My main source of inspiration, this dream of a website is filled with page after page of beautiful design and enthralling typography.

The Man Repeller
The Man Repeller mixes patterns like it’s her job and has a knack for satirical writing; she’s my current go-to for fashion and wit.

RoAndCo
RoAndCo is a Big Apple design studio that specializes in fashion branding. With resonant ideas and designs, their work inspires me on a daily basis.

Hannah:
Tiger in a Jar
The site explores themes of home and kinfolk, along with nature and locality. The haunting pastoral photography and short films are frequent muses.

Frankie
A publication that focuses on affordable fashion and arts & crafts; this isn’t really a current inspiration, but rather a constant fixation.

Toronto street fashion
It’s wonderful to see our city’s celebration of personal style.

Maegan:
Misprinted Type
The portfolio of artist/illustrator Eduardo Recife has been my foremost artistic inspiration since I first discovered Photoshop as a teenager. To this day, his mixture of collage elements and deconstructed, hand-drawn type is everything I want my work to be and more.

Girls
My love for Girls borders on obsessive. Lena Dunham is a genius; she’s somehow written a play-by-play of different moments throughout my life, except her version is hilarious.

Rodarte
Rodarte is my favourite fashion house because the pieces are not only mesmerizingly beautiful, but they are always rooted in an interesting and intelligent idea. Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the great minds behind Rodarte, design beautiful, intricate masterpieces that function as clothing as well as art. Also, they’re friends with Tavi: always a plus.

photography // Laura Tuttle

T-Shirt Manifesto

Threadless tells the story of how an idealistic vision became a design revoluion

Threadless is not just a t-shirt company that produces inspired graphic work, and it’s not just an internet upstart that championed “crowdsourcing” and social networking. In the words of co-founder Jake Nickell, Threadless “is a living breathing community of people that can’t be told what to do.” In Threadless: Ten Years of T-Shirts from the World’s Most Inspiring Online Design Community, Nickell chronicles the scrappy start-up’s rise over the past 10 years and makes a pretty good case that the company is something of a (t-shirt) revolution.

Nickell is joined by a cast of new media experts, designers, and fans who collectively recount the company’s deal: users are encouraged to upload designs and visitors vote on which t-shirt will go into production. Guest essayist Seth Godin writes that Threadless is, “a company that hires the unhireable, codes the uncodable [and] markets the unmarketable,” and Jeff Howe notes, “The genius of Threadless is that they put the community on a pedestal and then stepped into the background.” The mini-essays illustrate a company that democratizes art, and are the highlight of the book’s written content.

Text is dwarfed by the technicolour t-shirt designs and I found myself recognizing a lot of the prints as I pored over the pages, like this graphic of a badass Scooby-doo fanfic drawing of Velma with a shotgun and a bloodthirsty Scooby. Threadless’s designs have become pervasive over the past decade, and my sentiments on ubiquity were shared by those interviewed. Barnaby Bocock from New Zealand, speaking of his design “Nuts” said, “I think the ultimate compliment is seeing how much it has been ripped off. It was especially surreal when I found fakes being sold in Bangkok.”

Nickell’s strength as a businessman is sharing the spotlight. And although he’s writing about the company he started, the charismatic and critical engagement of other thinkers and artists are what put his success into a broader context and make it shine. As Nickell says: “Threadless is a community of people first, a t-shirt store second.” He gets away with wide-eyed utopian statements because the book is just as much an inspiring testament to sticking to your principles as proving that innovation can be more than empty business jargon. Threadless isn’t so much a coffee-table book as it is a colourful manifesto.

further reading // Threadless: Ten Years of T-Shirts from the World’s Most Inspiring Online Design Community by Jake Nickell and Jeffrey Kalmikoff // Henry N. Abrams // 2010

book report // Cayley James
images // Brianne Burnell

Landon Wornette

Our newest graphic designer explains why the best things in life are free

After graduating from Durham College’s Graphic Design program I was able to turn my love of making art into a career. I have been designing professionally for three years at Reactor studio, were I work in branding, editorial design, print advertising, digital design, and in many other aspects of the modern art world.

My style has a wide range but I feel most comfortable being simple, smart, and clean—with both design and fashion. My interest in fashion crept up on me shortly after moving to the city. Soon I found myself taking pride in my closet’s collection rather than sniffing clothing off my bedroom floor and picking the least aromatic pieces to sport for the day. I’m a huge penny-pincher and will only look at sale racks and second-hand stores. My favorite accessory for the summer has been a free pair of sunglasses that came with a 6-pack of Growers Apple Cider.

Community is very important to me, and the WORN Journal community may be one of the best I have found!

current inspirations // Stefan Sagmeister, Parra, and this song.

further reading // check out Landon in our issue 13 article “Unbinding Bianaries: using clothing to unlock the door of gender identity

photography // Brianne Burnell