Carl Wornette

Our newest styling intern is inspired by striking visuals and minerals and almost became a chemist

carl

Since boyhood, fashion has been my one true love. I grew up under the roof of a fashion house. My designer father and boutique-owner mother instilled in me the absolute conviction that I, too, would claim a place in their world. Though my passion for style has never truly wavered, I took tentative steps in other directions. Namely, I studied chemistry at Dalhousie, which I now look back on as such a departure. Thankfully, the decision to move to Toronto this September coincided with rediscovering my love of fashion and styling. And so, here I am: a Wornette.

Current Inspirations

Disturber Magazine

Predictably, my most powerful sources of inspiration are visual. This magazine, which showcases new work from emerging photographers, consistently provides me with these sources. Between the mind-blowing colours, patterns, and textures, Disturber Magazine is something I return to time and time again.

The Mineralogist

My roommate Kelsey is a goldsmith. When she showed me her collection of gemstones and jewels, it was instant love. I wanted more, more, MORE. The Mineralogist is a blog where I spend hours exploring my new-found passion for all that is shiny and sparkly.

A Pair & A Spare

This is a blog that shares lots of DIY fashion and home projects. It is actually very amazing and practical to see how your own hands can make things and how you too can become a “DIY fashionista.” For an aspiring fashion designer/stylist, this blog offers many learning opportunities!

Humans of New York

They say New York is the centre of the world. It’s true. The city is packed full of different people, cultures, and stories. This blog is not about fashionable, trendy people who are simply following the pack; it is about regular people living their daily lives. To me, this is just so much more interesting than the mediocrity of following.

Band of The Day App

This is a cool music app for smartphones. Every day, the app introduces one different band from all around the world. It is always refreshing and nice to hear some unusual and new music styles by different artists around the globe!

No Wornettes Were Harmed in the Making of this Blind Date

Anna and Eliza Wornette are locked in the office, asked to talk shoes, love it, and then go for drinks happily after

Anna and Eliza talk shoes

The lives of certain Wornettes intersect more than others. Editorial Wornettes gather around the table with other editorial Wornettes. Likewise for the stylists. This is just the nature of the magazine beast. But sometimes, serendipitously (read: when we ask them to), two Wornettes, who have not been able to get in as much quality time, sit down in the office for a good solid chat. And this time, the chat was about SHOES.

Anna: I’ve got big feet. They’re like, size 11/12 women’s and I wear a lot of like really simple flats ’cause I’m also six feet tall. I have this one pair of brown boots with a bit of a heel and they lace up. I got them at a vintage sale. They fit and I never find shoes that fit, especially not vintage. I think they’re originally from Aldo or someplace really boring but they’re the only heels I’m actually comfortable in.

Eliza: I don’t wear any heels either.

A: ‘Cause you’re also tall!

E: I’m pretty tall and when I wear high heels, I’m kind of towering over everyone. I don’t know. I like seeing other peoples’ faces.

A: I was in high school when Facebook became a thing, and everyone had joined Facebook groups. I was part of one called “Cute Girls with Big Feet” about where to find shoes for tall people. Then I got a friend request from a guy I didn’t know and he messaged me, “Do you have big feet? Do you have old shoes you can give me?” So I blocked him and every few months, I would get a friend request from Steven Smallfoot or Mr. Bigfoot Lover and I would just block him right away. He’d send me surveys like, “Eye color? Shoe size? Do you ever sweat in your shoes? What do your shoes smell like?” and they’d be like really sexual. So, I had to leave the group.

E: …Wow. [laughs]

A: I walk a lot and I don’t wear socks and my shoes do smell bad, so I probably could pay my rent by selling him my old shoes but I have not done that. True story. [laughs] Okay, what are the weirdest shoes that you own?

E: Actually I’m not sure I own any particularly weird shoes. My sibling actually got a really cool pair of shoes from Chinatown and they were Kool Aid shoes; they were completely orange.

A: Like dyed with Kool Aid, or?

E: They were orange shoes and then they had the Kool Aid mascot on them. Those shoes are awesome but I don’t really have any really statement-y shoes. I’ve always wanted these rain boots that I used to have when I was a kid. They had little frog eyes on the front.

A: Were they green?

E: Yes, they were green. But they definitely don’t make them in my size anymore.

A: I used to actually work at a shoe store as a quote-unquote sales associate which meant that like I had to find sizes for people. All the shoes were on the floor too, so I’d point and be like “Oh, there’s your size” and that was literally my job. People would ask me fashion questions, but we sold like the simplest generic shoes so I’d have to say “Sure, yeah, those like, black loafers are in for fall. You should get them. Or perhaps try brown. ” Like black and brown were the only colours.

E: My mom’s actually a really big shoe collector. Her eyes just light up around them. I guess that’s why I’m not as much into shoes, because I spent so much time in shoe stores when I was a kid. Hats were like my main priority because I’m tall; I feel like my shoes are so far away. I mean, your feet are at the bottom of your body.

A: But it’s something you notice because shoes change the way you walk and stand and hold yourself more than really any other clothes, unless you’re wearing a corset or something.

E: Do you have a dream pair of shoes that you’ve kind of always been looking for but never found?

A: When I pay attention to runway shows, I don’t look at shoes as much but there was this Balenciaga shoe in, I want to say it was 2009, and the heels were like rock mineral experiments. Something you would look at in a high school geology. Is geology even a thing you do in high school?

E: I’ve always liked this shoe designed by Jeremy Scott. Just these sneakers that are fuzzy and had a teddy bear attached to them.

A: That’s such a you thing to like.

E: I’ve been obsessing over them. I think that kind of shoe is like, really a statement shoe.

A: It’s kind of like a grownup version of those rain boots.

E: Yes. [laughs]

A: I’m into sneakers lately. I’m like, “I’m laid back. I’m cool. I wear sneakers with my dress.”

E: When I was a teenager, I really liked Lily Allen. She always wore those prom dresses with the sneakers and big hoops. I had never thought of someone dressing up like that and wearing such casual shoes. There’s this movie I saw, Party Girl.

A: With Parker Posey?

E: She’s the most memorable character from movies or TV shows with her shoes. She was wearing these platform sneakers. They were white.

A: Platforms. Oh god!

E: I really love them, though.

A: All I can think of is the Spice Girls and the Union Jack shoes.

E: When I was 16, I went to New York with my mom and we were looking through all the stores on Bleecker Street. There’s one store I really liked so we were spending a bit more time there. It was pretty empty and there was a photographer in the store. And then the photographer started talking to us and said that they were doing an article about round-toed heels, which were in style at the time, and that they needed someone to wear them for the photoshoot.

A: That’s such a “small town girl goes to the big city and becomes a model” thing [laughs].

E: It was in the New York Times. My dad sent it to all the relatives.

A: So you’ve been in The Times!

E: I don’t even know if I actually read the article! [laughs] I was just like, “Cool!”

A: Did you end up getting the shoes?

E: No. I felt like I should get the shoes, it was a pretty nice store, but I would always rather buy a hat.

illustration // Averill Smith

Calling All Cool Kittens: The Black Cat Ball Is Coming

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On Saturday, November 23, WORN Fashion Journal will get your inner kitten out of the alley and onto the dance floor with our Black Cat Ball. Bring out your best ball style in black and white and watch as fashion comes on little cat feet. Bring a date or just walk on your wild lone.

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If luck is a lady (or at least not a jerk) you’ll get a shot at our raffle. We’ll be offering purrecious prizes from:

The Beguiling
The Believer
Broken Pencil
Buy Olympia
Canadian Art
Come As You Are
Dear Kates
Drawn & Quarterly
Etsy
Gloomth
Hailo
Leaves of Trees
Little Island Comics
Little Brother
Liz Worth
Penguin Books Canada
Soak
…and more!

Tip the scales with extra raffle tickets for just $1. Want to frolic with fellow felines? Our cat ear headbands will have you meowing for more.

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And when you’re done with the madness, move onto the magic. We predict you’ll get your whiskers in a twist with an eclectic mix of highly danceable oldies and favourites with WORN’s own Teddy the K.

THE BLACK CAT BALL

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Dovercourt House

805 Dovercourt Rd, Toronto

Scratch at the door: 9:00 p.m.

Pawll for a taxi: 2:00 a.m.

Don’t purrcrastinate—order your advance tickets for only $10 right meow.

Sponsored by
She Does The City
BlogTO
Hailo
Ontario Arts Council

Très Click: “Cool Japan Initiative” Edition

Wornettes love the internet; here's what we've been reading recently

Craft collective Blackmeans, via Business of Fashion

Craft collective Blackmeans, via Business of Fashion

The Ups and Downs of Japan Fashion Week
Style blogger extraordinaire Susie Bubble recently went to Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in Tokyo and reported on it for Business of Fashion. It opens with an account of a very business-like presentation (flow charts are involved) on steps the Tokyo fashion industry plans to take in better integrating itself in the global fashion market. It’s a fascinating look at the intersection of some of fashion’s most artistic and commercial aspects, made palatable by Susie’s accessible writing. Plus, there are some great looks at some of the season’s more memorable collections.

What My Daughter Wore
In this charming take on personal style blogs, a Brooklyn artist illustrates outfits worn by her children and their friends. These kids have a better aesthetic sensibility than I do now in my twenties—my personal faves include the looks dubbed “Space Jam” and “Front Pocket Candy.”

The Logic of Stupid Poor People
Many of the think pieces that I read on conspicuous consumption tend to take an un-nuanced (though not necessarily inaccurate) angle on the flaws of capitalism. Tressie McMillan Cottom writes this brilliant piece that implores people to take into account personal narratives that may lead a lower class person to spend $2,500 on a handbag.

Fashion Victims Unite: Manchester’s Late ’70s – Early ’80s Perry Boys Subculture
Sigh. I spend so much time reading about fashion and fashion history, fooling myself into believing I have a pretty extensive knowledge on Things That Have Happened in Regards to Clothing, only to stumble onto articles about entire stylish subcultures that I had no idea existed (like this one, over at Dangerous Minds). Frequent reminders that there is always more to learn.

Princess in the Land of Machos
I leave you with Nicola Ókin Frioli’s photo series on Mexico’s cross-dressing community. These gorgeous shots speak for themselves. What are you doing still reading this? Go check it out.