Another Example of How All Human Knowledge is Slowly Being Transferred to YouTube and Why You Can (and Should) Cut your Hair at Home

I spent forty minutes watching “Asian Mullet” tutorials on YouTube. Favoured mostly by teenage girls with waist-length, dead-straight hair, the style wasn’t an intuitive choice, but the more I watched, the more they won me over.

Mostly, I’ve had it with my crappy hair. Over the last couple of months (as it grows out) it has been good for nothing outside of short and occasionally painful French braids. Of course, a DIY adventure had its own drawbacks (a bad cut and not enough left for braids at all). But if American Idol and these modern times have taught me anything, it’s that I should not let actual, provable, corporeal limitations dissuade me from making dubious and impulsive decisions.

So I grabbed the scissors and hacked at my hair for an hour and now I have some sort of shag thing happening. And it’s kind of awesome — and it wasn’t that hard.

- g.

Read more about G’s haircutting adventures in Issue 12.

3 thoughts on “Another Example of How All Human Knowledge is Slowly Being Transferred to YouTube and Why You Can (and Should) Cut your Hair at Home

  1. “Why you can (and should) cut your hair at home”. I cannot stop laughing at the wording of this post. And I fully agree; if they teach us anything, reality TV shows demonstrate you can get very far indeed with dubious natural talents. Also, your hair looks de-lovely.

  2. I’ve been wanting to learn how to my cut my hair for ages now! I have a pixie cut that requires constant maintenance so to save on those monthly trips to the hair dresser it seems like a good idea! Thanks for the inspiration maybe I’ll start looking up tutorials

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